Monday, April 5, 2010

Les Schwab

Charlie Munger uses simple microeconomics to explain the success of the Les Schwab tire store chain. The following is from a speech he gave at the University of California back in 2003:

Case Study: Les Schwab Tires

"There's a tire store chain in the Northwest, which has slowly succeeded over 50 years, the Les Schwab tire store chain. It just ground ahead. It started competing with the stores that were owned by the big tire companies that made all the tires, the Goodyears and so forth. And, of course, the manufacturers favored their own stores. Their 'tied stores' had a big cost advantage. Later, Les Schwab rose in competition with the huge price discounters like Costco and Sam's Club and before that Sears Roebuck and so forth. And yet here is Schwab now, with hundreds of millions of dollars in sales. And here's Les Schwab in his 80s, with no education, having done the whole thing. How did he do it? (Pause). I don't see a whole lot of people looking like a light bulb has come on. Well, let's think about it with some microeconomic fluency.

Is there some wave that Schwab could have caught? The minute you ask the question, the answer pops in. The Japanese had a zero position in tires and they got big. So this guy must have ridden that wave some in the early times. Then the slow following success has to have some other causes. And what probably happened here, obviously, is this guy did one hell of a lot of things right. And among the things that he must have done right is he must have harnessed what Mankiw calls the superpower of incentives. He must have a very clever incentive structure driving his people. And a clever personnel selection system, etc. And he must be pretty good at advertising. Which he is. He's an artist. So, he had to get a wave in Japanese tire invasion, the Japanese being as successful as they were. And then a talented fanatic had to get a hell of a lot of things right, and keep them right with clever systems. Again, not that hard of an answer. But what else would be a likely cause of the peculiar success?

We hire business school graduates and they're no better at these problems than you were. Maybe that's the reason we hire so few of them." - Charlie Munger


It's definitely well worth checking out the rest of what Munger had to say during the speech.

Adam

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